Body art – Performance, the focus on the body

The foremost purpose of performance art has almost always been to challenge the conventions of traditional forms of visual art such as painting and sculpture. When these modes no longer seem to answer artists’ needs – when they seem too conservative, or too enmeshed in the traditional art world and too distant from ordinary people – artists have often turned to performance in order to find new audiences and test new ideas…

Amikor a hagyományos képzőművészetek, a festészet és a szobrászat már nem elég, hogy válaszoljon a művész igényeinek… tesztelik az új ötleteket, keresik az új közönséget…

The focus on the body
The focus on the body

Piet Mondrian: Farm Near Duivendrecht, in the Evening

Piet Mondrian (1872-1944): Farm Near Duivendrecht, in the Evening (c.1916): strong lines dominate this scene of a farmhouse at twilight. The dwindling light at the end of the day creates a halo of vibrant orange around the interlocking web of barren trees, highlighting the linear patterns created by their branches. Piet Mondrian often visited this farm near Duivendrecht, a small village near Amsterdam, and made many paintings of the building and surrounding trees. This scene captures his attentiveness to the nuances of light, shadow, and reflection. The painting simultaneously hints at the artist’s growing interest in the flattening of forms and the linear structures of his later fully abstract paintings…

Piet Mondrian Farm Near Duivendrecht, in the Evening

Wassily Kandinsky: Composition VII,

Of all the arts, abstract painting is the most difficult. It demands that you know how to draw well, that you have a heightened sensitivity for composition and for colors, and that you be a true poet. This last is essential…
Composition VII,: Kandinsky’s masterpiece, without doubt it is the acme of his artistic achievements during the period in Munich…
Wassily Kandinsky (1896-1944): Composition VII, (1913)

Wassily Kandinsky Composition VII

Claude Monet: Poppies

Claude Monet (1840-1926): Poppies (1873) Now one of the world’s most famous paintings, it conjures up the vibrant atmosphere of a stroll through the fields on a summer’s day. Monet diluted the contours and constructed a colourful rhythm with blobs of paint starting from a sprinkling of poppies. The disproportionately large patches in the foreground indicate the primacy he put on visual impression. A step towards abstraction had been taken.
In the landscape, a mother and child pair in the foreground and another in the background are merely a pretext for drawing the diagonal line that structures the painting. Two separate colour zones are established, one dominated by red, the other by a bluish green. The young woman with the sunshade and the child in the foreground are probably the artist’s wife, Camille, and their son Jean…

Claude Monet Poppies 1873