Jeanne sur le balcon de la villa Demière

Henri Manguin (French, 1874-1949): Jeanne sur le balcon de la villa Demière, 1905 (Oil on canvas) – From 1905 onward Manguin and his family spent summers at the Villa Demière near Saint-Tropez, where Jeanne would pose for him in the bright sun. His palette, formerly rather dark, became much lighter. More pure reds, greens, and yellows began to appear in his work…

Henri Manguin  Jeanne sur le balcon de la villa Demière

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L’Atelier de la Rue Séguier

Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953): L’Atelier de la Rue Séguier, 1909 (Oil on canvas) – While painting with Braque at L’Estaque in 1908, Dufy began moving away from the bright tones of his Fauve period and towards a more volumetric conception in space. The strong palette and striking composition of L’Atelier de la Rue Séguier evoke the dialogue between the two movements as Dufy finds his way. For him, Cubism represented an attempt to bring coherence to painting in a manner suggested by Cézanne…

Raoul Dufy  L'Atelier de la Rue Séguier,

Cafe de la Paix

Richard Miller (American, 1875-1943): Cafe de la Paix, 1905 (Oil on canvas) – The Café de la Paix opened June 30, 1862, to serve the Grand-Hôtel de la Paix (named after the nearby rue de la Paix), whose name was later shortened to Grand-Hôtel. It serviced visitors of Expo exhibition in 1867. Its proximity to the Opéra attracted many famous clients, including Jules Massenet, Émile Zola, and Guy de Maupassant…

Richard Miller  Cafe de la Paix

Portrait of a Woman

Leo Putz (Austrian, 1869-1940): Portrait of a Woman (1922) – In 1899, Paul Höcker’s studio class founded the artist group “Scholle”. Putz was one of its founding members. The group confronted the predominant academic style and Historicism with a new, temperamental painting style, which was influenced by Wilhelm Trübner. The central subject was the depiction of people, mainly women…

Leo Putz  Portrait of a Woman

À la Campagne

Ludovic Alleaume (French, 1859-1941): À la Campagne c.1896 (Oil on canvas) – Alleaume’s figures are painted en plein air. It seems unlikely that the sunshine filtering through the translucent red parasol and casting its rays on the silhouettes of the two models was a creation made in the studio; the effect is too convincingly realistic. The centerpiece of the painting is clearly the fashion. While the delicate, floral patterned dress mirrors the surrounding wild-flowers, the greatest fashion statement is made by the tartan plaid…

Ludovic Alleaume  À la Campagne