April Ball (Black Swan)

In the world according to “LAC (After Swan Lake),” a trashy reinterpretation by Jean-Christophe Maillot for Les Ballets de Monte Carlo, there are two types of women: the kind you marry and the kind you sleep with. April Ball’s primal Black Swan is a predator. Her mother, known as Her Majesty of the Night (Maude Sabourin), is even more overheated. – April Ball (Black Swan) in LAC, Les Ballets de Monte Carlo, April 2014. © Dave Morgan

April Ball (Black Swan)

Csendélet fotó

Still life photography. Ez a megfestetlen csendélet ugyanolyan csendet teremt az életben, mintha festmény lenne… Benne van a csendéletek arisztokratikus higgadtsága, kiszámíthatatlansága, és egy csipetnyi lomhasággal álcázott élénk frissesség. Az elrendezett kuszaság meghozza – itt a fényképen is – a minden a helyén van érzést és ugyanúgy belerángat a csendélet intimitásába, mintha festmény lenne… Fényképezzünk több csendéletet!

nemeth gyorgy - csendelet

Self-Portrait

Alice Bailly (Swiss, 1872-1938) – Self-Portrait, 1917 (Oil on canvas. National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC) – The red, orange, and blue hues echo the palette of Fauve paintings. The arching lines forming her hands and arms echo Italian Futurist art. Bailly embraced the insouciance of Dada by carefully delineating her breasts, the buttons of her jacket, and her signature bob haircut while painting out the entire right side of her face. Bailly painted intuitively and additively.

Alice Bailly - Self-Portrait

Studio under the Eaves

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954) – Studio under the Eaves, 1903 (Oil on canvas. Fitzwilliam Museum) – The makeshift, spartan look of this studio suggests the painter’s financial straits. His palette rests upon a simple wooden crate. His easel is set up before a folding table on which stands a single vase containing two dahlias. The two skylights do little to illuminate the interior. Even the daylight that enters the open window only serves to intensify the darkness of the foreground by casting a long dark shadow.

Henri Matisse - Studio under the Eaves

Leda and The Swan

Louis Icart (French, 1888 -1950) – Leda and The Swan, 1934 (Etching and aquatint, varnished) – Why do we not acknowledge the phenomenon of black swans until after they occur? The hubris of predictions and our perpetual surprise when the not-predicted happens. We concentrate on things we already know but we fail to predict the impossible. The history of a thousand days that tell you nothing about what is to happen next…

Louis Icart - Leda and The Swan